Ecogeographic isolation under climate change

Karl Duffy‘s paper on ecogeographical isolation is published in the latest issue of Journal of Ecology (107.1). Karl tells us more about his paper in the blog post below.  Since Humboldt, evolutionary biologists and ecologists have been interested in the geographical distributions of plants. Prior to the Modern Synthesis, ecological and geographical (ecogeographical) differences between…

Age-dependent trait expression in plants

Brandie Quarles (Duke University) gives some background on her recent paper on ageing in plants.  Ageing, or senescence, is defined as a decline in function and an increased risk of mortality with increasing age. When many people hear the word aging, they likely think about it in the context of humans or other animals. I’ve…

The long shadow of Humboldt

The latest mini-review published in Journal of Ecology is Humboldt and the reinvention of nature by Juli Pausas and William Bond. Juli shares the inspiration behind the paper below. It all started when I was reading an excellent book by Andrea Wulf titled The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World. The book provides…

Growth or mortality? How demography shapes tropical seedling distributions along a soil moisture gradient

Following on from iDiv’s press release, lead author Stefan Kupers shares some background on their study about tropical tree species and drought and reflects on the significance of the findings.  Despite high annual rainfall, tropical forests can suffer severe droughts. These droughts are expected to become more frequent and extreme with climate change. On regional…

Nitrogen recycling in coupled green and brown food webs

Robert Buchkowski has written a blog post about his Journal of Ecology paper on how interactions between green and brown food webs impact plants and nutrient cycling.  Herbivores indirectly impact plant growth by altering the speed at which nutrients are recycled through the soil and back into plant tissue. Changes in plant leaf chemical or physical…

BFBI: Ulmus glabra

The latest Biological Flora of the British Isles account is Ulmus glabra, written by Peter Thomas, Duncan Stone, and Nicole La Porta. Peter Thomas tells us more about Ulmus glabra in the blog post below. Find this account, and the rest of the series, online in the new BFBI database.  A recent visit to Aberdeen was…

Darwin’s naturalization conundrum reconciled

Eva Malecore tells us more about her newly published paper about the effects of phylogenetic distance on seedling emergence… In his “Origin of Species” of 1859, Charles Darwin expressed the hypothesis that exotic species more closely related to the native community would be more likely to naturalize, since they would share preadaptation to the local environment.…

Species and genetic diversity in grasslands

Jennifer Rowntree (Manchester Metropolitan University) and Hayley Craig (University of Manchester) have had their study on grassland species and genetic diversity published in Journal of Ecology. Jennifer tells us more about the paper in the article below, and you can also read the Manchester Metropolitan University press release. We are currently experiencing a ‘biodiversity crisis’…

Fig-wasp mutualisms

Daniel Souto‐Vilarós tells us more about his recent Journal of Ecology paper on fig-wasp mutualisms. You can see Daniel present his work at Evolution 2018 – his poster is part of Session 1 and will be available to view up on Level 2 on August 19th and 20th (Poster number: P-0200, S-18).  Plant-pollinator interactions offer a unique…

Tracing plant genotype-by-environment effects on biodiversity

Matt Barbour tells us about his recently published paper; Trait plasticity is more important than genetic variation in determining species richness of associated communities. If you are at Evolution 2018 in Montpellier, you can hear more about Matt’s work in his presentation: Food-web complexity alters the fitness landscape of an insect herbivore (Monday 20th August, Auditorium Berlioz, 10.10am, as part of…