Australia’s giant forests may become increasingly at risk with climate change —What should we do?

Newly published article, finds that among Australian tall wet eucalypt forest, severe fires are likelier in hotter, drier climates – suggesting vulnerability to climate change: “Bioclimatic drivers of fire severity across the Australian geographical range of giant Eucalyptus forests” by Furlaud, Prior, Williamson & Bowman. Here, authors James Furlaud and David Bowman discuss their research…

Call for proposals: Leveraging natural history collections to understand the impacts of global change

Natural history collections in museums, herbaria, seed banks, and tissue banks provide some of the most valuable information sources in an ecologist’s toolbox: time series data. These collections not only permanently archive preserved specimens, but also critical historical and contemporary information about how species distributions, interactions, and phenotypes respond to global change across time scales.…

On the speed of plants

Author Daniel Montesinos discusses his recent Journal of Ecology article: “Fast invasives fastly become faster: Invasive plants align largely with the fast side of the plant economics spectrum.” Find out more about the plant economics spectrum and how invasive plants align largely with the fast side. This mini-review is part of our upcoming Special Feature…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 109 Issue 4

The Editor’s Choice for our April issue is “Dynamic feedbacks among tree functional traits, termite populations and deadwood turnover” by Guo, Tuo, Ci, Yan & Cornelissen. The findings of this article imply that tree functional composition, with variation in deadwood quality through decomposition time, can help to sustain termite populations and thereby forest carbon turnover. Here…

Cover stories: Volume 109 Issue 4

The cover image for our April issue shows a rodent herbivore alongside black mangrove seedlings, in a Florida salt marsh. Author and photographer, Rachel S. Smith, describes how she and her team tracked down this mystery mangrove muncher!This image relates to recently published research article: “Dead litter of resident species first facilitates and then inhibits sequential life…

Volume 109 Issue 4

Volume 109 Issue 4 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! Our April issue contains a fascinating range of articles, including research that quantifies nectar production by flowering plants in urban and rural landscapes, a study which found that warming effects on wood decomposition depend on fungal assembly history and an article that examined the dynamics of canopy‐forming seaweed…

Jane Catford – Senior Editor

Journal of Ecology is very excited to announce that Jane Catford will be joining our Senior Editor team! Jane has been an Associate Editor with our journal since 2016 and we’re thrilled to see her take on this new role. Jane is a plant community ecologist based at King’s College London, UK. Jane has an…

Citizen Science: Follow the steps of Charles Darwin and glimpse into cowslip flowers this Spring!

We’re spotlighting the Looking for Cowslips citizen science campaign! Organiser Tsipe Aavik shares more about this citizen science project, the findings so far and how you can take part in this campaign. If you’re interested in getting involved with a cowslip survey this Spring, you can find out more here! You can also read the…

Gulls can spread weeds over large distances and between habitats

Authors, Víctor Martín-Vélez and Andy J. Green, discuss their recent study which highlights the importance of non‐frugivorous waterbirds as vectors for long‐distance plant dispersal: Spatial patterns of weed dispersal by wintering gulls within and beyond an agricultural landscape. You can also read the Press Release for this article here. Weeds are plants that spontaneously grow…