2021 Harper Prize Shortlist: Early Career Research Award

The Harper Prize is awarded annually by the British Ecological Society for the best paper in Journal of Ecology by an early career author. We are pleased to present the shortlisted papers for the 2021 award (published in Volume 109): ⭐️ Christine Åkesson: Long-term ecological legacies in western Amazonia ⭐️ Paula Berenstecher: Worlds apart: Location above- or below-ground determines plant litter…

📚 Journal Club round-up

For anyone who missed it, we held our first Journal Club discussion last week, on Twitter! The featured paper was the Sprent Review article: Multi‐dimensionality as a path forward in plant‐soil feedback research, by Michael Gundale and Paul Kardol. To kick things off, the authors prepared a fantastic 12-minute video filmed around a campfire, in which…

Cover stories: Volume 110 Issue 2

The cover image for our February issue features a Female Asian elephant foraging in a dipterocarp forest of Peninsular Malaysia. This image relates to the research article: The ability to disperse large seeds, rather than body mass alone, defines the importance of animals in a hyper-diverse seed dispersal network, by Lisa Ong, Kim McConkey and Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz.…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 110 Issue 2

The editor’s choice for our February issue is “Not all trees can make a forest: Tree species composition and competition control forest encroachment in a tropical savanna” by Flake et al. Here, Associate Editor María Natalia Umaña explains the importance of this research.  As a tropical forest ecologist, I’ve been concerned about the increasing deforestation rates…

Why trait-based ecology is full of surprises

Noémie Pichon discusses her recent article: ‘Intraspecific trait changes have large impacts on community functional composition but do not affect ecosystem function‘. Find out more about this new research into intraspecific trait variation and its importance for understanding community functional composition. Trait variation is as large within as between species, but it doesn’t mean the…

Grime Reviews, Series 3: Phil Grime’s impact on the present and future of plant ecology

Grime Reviews are a series of Reviews honouring eminent ecologist J. Philip (Phil) Grime, who passed away in April 2021 after a long career that touched on nearly every aspect of plant ecology. The third round of Grime Reviews will revisit Grime’s seminal contributions from an array of modern viewpoints and describe how his ideas helped drive a paradigm shift,…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 110 Issue 1

The editor’s choice for our January issue is “Biodiversity–productivity relationships in a natural grassland community vary under diversity loss scenarios” by Pan et al. Here, Associate Editor Eric Lamb explains the importance of this research.  This paper is a fascinating exploration of the complexity of diversity – productivity relationships. With the recent loss of Philip…