Grasslands and Climate Change

Grasslands are the most extensive terrestrial biome, and have the largest total global accumulation of soil carbon. Grasslands and their ecotonal neighbours the savannas, have been the crucible for much of human history and activity.  However, despite being lauded and loved because of their charismatic megafauna (e.g., lions in African grasslands and savannas, bison in…

Snail herbivory in forest communities

Anna Liang (Washington University in St. Louis, USA) and colleagues recently had their paper on snail herbivory published in Journal of Ecology. This study was a large part of Anna’s undergraduate senior thesis done under the supervision of Scott Mangan and Claudia Stein. Many thanks to Claudia and Anna for sharing these photos from their…

Effects of climate change‐induced early flowering

Journal of Ecology author and Associate Editor Amy Iler tells us more about her new paper on the effects of climate change‐induced early flowering in aspen sunflowers… As someone who has spent hours upon hours counting flowers at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (RMBL) to measure flowering phenology, I often wondered how the changes in flowering…

International Women’s Day: Balance for Better

Friday 8th March is International Women’s Day – a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The theme for 2019 is Balance for Better. Find out more on Twitter by following @womensday and using #IWD2019 and #BalanceforBetter.  To mark International Women’s Day 2019 we hear from our Associate Editors Imma Oliveras and Mahasweta…

Fieldwork in the French Alps

Before writing and publishing papers and presenting exciting new findings, most ecologists experience one of the best things about doing science: field work! If you are lucky – as I was in this case – doing field work means great weather, an awesome team, a beautiful landscape, hard work, good samples, lots of fun and…

Ecological Succession in a Changing World

Cynthia Chang and Ben Turner are the guest editors for our latest special feature: Ecological Succession in a Changing World. Cynthia and Ben tell us more about their special feature and the inspiration behind it, below.  There is no doubt that succession is a foundation of ecology. However, when ecologists talk about succession, it often…

Ecological Inspirations: Crystal McMichael

Crystal McMichael is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecosystem and Landscape Dynamics at the University of Amsterdam. Her research interests are focused on assessing long-term (100s to 1000s of years) ecological processes in tropical ecosystems, and how distributions of species (including people) have changed over those time scales. Crystal is particularly interested in how tropical…

Volume 107 Issue 2

Volume 107 Issue 2 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! This issue includes a fascinating special feature on ecological succession. The special feature, guest edited by Ben Turner and Cynthia Chang, brings together work that highlights the importance of ecological succession in understanding the response of plant and microbial communities to disturbance. The…