Volume 109 Issue 9

Volume 109 Issue 9 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! Our September issue contains a new Special Feature: Reconciling resilience across ecological systems, species and subdisciplines. This cross-journal special feature presents 30 fascinating articles published in Journal of Ecology, Journal of Animal Ecology and Functional Ecology, including the accompanying Editorial article. This Special Feature was overseen by Editors Pol…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 109 Issue 8

The Editor’s Choice for our August issue is “The fate and transit time of carbon in a tropical forest” by Carlos A. Sierra, Lina M. Estupinan-Suarez, & Ingrid Chanca. This research article provides an estimate of the transit time distribution of carbon in a Colombian tropical forest ecosystem using a data assimilation technique to parameterise a dynamic…

Volume 109 Issue 8

Volume 109 Issue 8 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! Our August issue contains an essay review considering the past, present, and future of herbivore impacts on savanna vegetation, a paper that explores habitat fragmentation and food security in crop pollination systems & long-term study of primary succession in an Atlantic salt marsh. The Editor’s…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 109 Issue 7

The Editor’s Choice for our July issue is “Plant diversity effects on plant longevity and their relationships to population stability in experimental grasslands” by Roeder et al. The findings of this article show that the diversity of a grassland community can directly affect the longevity of the forbs, and thereby the temporal stability of populations…

Volume 109 Issue 7

Volume 109 Issue 7 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! Our July issue contains the first ever International Biological Flora account! Journal of Ecology has been publishing in-depth plant accounts since 1941 – but these have all previously described species native to the British Isles. The first international species to be featured is Nervilia nipponica, a rare…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 109 Issue 6

The Editor’s Choice for our June issue is “Disentangling the social complexities of assisted migration through deliberative methods” by Shannon Hagerman & Robert Kozak. This mini-review identifies a novel deliberative agenda for understanding the societal aspects and implications of plant translocation research and practice. This article is also part of our new cross-journal Special Focus: Plant translocations…

Volume 109 Issue 6

Volume 109 Issue 6 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! Our June issue contains a new cross-journal Special Focus with Ecological Solutions and Evidence: Plant translocations and climate change: bioassay, surveillance and solution to a global threat. There are 8 insightful research articles and review papers in this collection, including the accompanying Editorial article. This Special Focus was overseen…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 109 Issue 5

The Editor’s Choice for our May issue is “Herbivore dung stoichiometry drives competition between savanna trees and grasses” by Judith Sitters & Harry Olde Venterink. This article shows that browsing and grazing herbivores potentially help maintain the tree‐grass balance in African savanna, through variation in the nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) ratio of their dung! Here the…

Volume 109 Issue 5

Volume 109 Issue 5 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! Our May issue contains a new Special Feature: Facilitative mechanisms underlying the effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning. There are 9 fascinating research articles and review papers included in this collection, including the accompanying Editorial article. This Special Feature was overseen by Guest Editors Alexandra (Sasha) J.…

Editor’s Choice: Volume 109 Issue 4

The Editor’s Choice for our April issue is “Dynamic feedbacks among tree functional traits, termite populations and deadwood turnover” by Guo, Tuo, Ci, Yan & Cornelissen. The findings of this article imply that tree functional composition, with variation in deadwood quality through decomposition time, can help to sustain termite populations and thereby forest carbon turnover. Here…