Harper Prize Winner 2019: Maria Leunda

Author Maria Leunda offers an insight into the research behind her paper Ice cave reveals environmental forcing of long‐term Pyrenean tree line dynamics, which won our 2019 Harper Prize. Maria also further discusses how she ended up doing this exciting research and introduces her study site in the Central Pyrenees.  Alpine ecosystems are particularly sensitive…

Harper Prize Shortlist 2019: Ole Petter Laksforsmo Vindstad

The Journal of Ecology article “Can novel pest outbreaks drive ecosystem transitions in northern‐boreal birch forest?” was shortlisted for the Harper Prize early researcher award earlier this spring. In this blog post, first author Ole Petter Laksforsmo Vindstad explains how the emergence of novel climate-driven outbreaks by phytophagous insects came to define the trajectory of…

Harper Prize Shortlist 2019: Katie Baer

In this post author Katie Baer, offers an insight into her paper Declining demographic performance and dispersal limitation influence the geographic distribution of the perennial forb Astragalus utahensis (Fabaceae), which was shortlisted for the 2019 Harper Prize.  Katie also discusses her wider research and ecological career. You can see a full list of all shortlisted papers in the Harper…

2019 Harper Prize Winner: Maria Leunda

The John L Harper Early Career Researcher Award is given each year to the best paper in the journal by an early career author at the start of their career. We’re delighted to announce that the 2019 winner is Maria Leunda her article ‘Ice cave reveals environmental forcing of long‐term Pyrenean tree line dynamics. The…

2019 Harper Prize Shortlist: Early Career Research Award

The Harper Prize is awarded by the British Ecological Society each year for the best paper in Journal of Ecology written by an early career author. Today we are pleased to present the shortlisted papers for this year’s award. These papers were published in 2019 (Volume 107, Issues 1-6). The winner will be selected in the coming weeks so…

Harper Prize Highly Commended Papers 2017: Plant-Soil Interactions (Part 2)

In this second Harper Prize video podcast, I present the findings of my highly commended paper entitled ‘Stoichiometric N:P flexibility and mycorrhizal symbiosis favour plant resistance against drought‘. This experiment was carried out at The University of Sydney (Australia) with Alberto Canarini and Feike Dijkstra through a postdoctoral fellowship from the Swiss National Science Foundation.…

Harper Prize Highly Commended Papers 2017: Plant-Soil Interactions (Part 1)

Each year, as well as selecting an overall winner for the Harper Prize (Jenny Zambrano, see previous blog post), the editors of Journal of Ecology also select two highly commended papers. This year the two highly commended papers are from Connor Fitzpatrick et al. titled ‘Phylogenetic relatedness, phenotypic similarity and plant–soil feedbacks‘ and myself, Pierre Mariotte et al.…