Issue 105.1 slideshow

For the cover image for our latest issue we chose a photo from one of the Special Feature papers (Farwig et al. 2016) which showed an area of the Białowieża Forest in Eastern Poland. To make the most of all the great photos from our authors we have included a slideshow below. Read the full January…

More on #BES2015

The BES annual meeting is officially over, and what an amazing meeting it was! See the summary from Journal of Ecology’s Executive Editor David Gibson for his insight into #BES2015. Take note of the Special Features on two of the thematic topics that we hope to publish in the Journal over the next 12 months…

Editor’s Choice 103:3

Issue 103:3 is online now. The latest Editor’s Choice paper is “A spatially explicit model for flowering time in bamboos: long rhizomes drive the evolution of delayed flowering” by Tachiki et al. Associate Editor – Richard Shefferson – has written a commentary on the paper below. Bamboos, sex, and the ultimate sacrifice Nature is a…

Demography to infinity and beyond!

One of my favourite manuscripts provides a detailed account as to why evolutionary biologists should be demographers (Metcalf & Pavard 2007). The authors argue that, because the propagation of genes into future generations depends on the st/age-specific vital rates of survival, fecundity and migration of individuals within and between populations, and such rates are precisely…

Roberto Salguero-Gómez interviews Hal Caswell

Last year Roberto Salguero-Gómez (Associate Editor, Journal of Ecology) interviewed Hal Caswell and you can listen to the interview in its entirety below. Roberto and Hal are co-authors on “The COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database: an open online repository for plant demography“, which was published in Journal of Ecology in issue 1 of 2015.   Roberto is…

Indirect effects and facilitation among native and non-native species promote invasion success along an environmental stress gradient

Dr. Phoebe Zarnetske and colleagues have a paper in the Journal in Early View titled Indirect effects and facilitation among native and non-native species promote invasion success along an environmental stress gradient. Read the paper here. The authors have provided a short synopsis of the paper some great photos of the study site.