Volume 107 Issue 2

Volume 107 Issue 2 of Journal of Ecology is now available online! This issue includes a fascinating special feature on ecological succession. The special feature, guest edited by Ben Turner and Cynthia Chang, brings together work that highlights the importance of ecological succession in understanding the response of plant and microbial communities to disturbance. The…

Fieldwork in Borneo

The Bornean rainforest is one of the most ecologically diverse habitats for an ecologist to explore. Ryan Veryard (third year student at Oxford University) has kindly sent us some photos of his fieldwork in Borneo as a part of his third year project working with Andy Hector (Professor of Ecology, Oxford, and Journal of Ecology…

Ecogeographic isolation under climate change

Karl Duffy‘s paper on ecogeographical isolation is published in the latest issue of Journal of Ecology (107.1). Karl tells us more about his paper in the blog post below.  Since Humboldt, evolutionary biologists and ecologists have been interested in the geographical distributions of plants. Prior to the Modern Synthesis, ecological and geographical (ecogeographical) differences between…

Age-dependent trait expression in plants

Brandie Quarles (Duke University) gives some background on her recent paper on ageing in plants.  Ageing, or senescence, is defined as a decline in function and an increased risk of mortality with increasing age. When many people hear the word aging, they likely think about it in the context of humans or other animals. I’ve…

The long shadow of Humboldt

The latest mini-review published in Journal of Ecology is Humboldt and the reinvention of nature by Juli Pausas and William Bond. Juli shares the inspiration behind the paper below. It all started when I was reading an excellent book by Andrea Wulf titled The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World. The book provides…

Growth or mortality? How demography shapes tropical seedling distributions along a soil moisture gradient

Following on from iDiv’s press release, lead author Stefan Kupers shares some background on their study about tropical tree species and drought and reflects on the significance of the findings.  Despite high annual rainfall, tropical forests can suffer severe droughts. These droughts are expected to become more frequent and extreme with climate change. On regional…

Soil moisture matters, even in tropical rainforests

German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) press release. Growth rates shape species distributions of tropical tree seedlings on a soil moisture gradient, according to a new study published in Journal of Ecology. Even in wet environments like tropical rainforests, tree species are separated along local gradients of soil moisture. Researchers from iDiv found evidence…

Meet the Editor: David Gibson

Not long to go now until the 2018 British Ecological Society Annual Meeting where you have a chance to chat to some of our Senior Editors. Get to know the people behind the decision letters in our Meet the Editor series. Below, we talk to David Gibson. What can you tell us about the first…

Meet the Editor: Mark Rees

Not long to go now until the 2018 British Ecological Society Annual Meeting where you have a chance to chat to some of our Senior Editors. Get to know the people behind the decision letters in our Meet the Editor series. Below, we talk to Mark Rees. What can you tell us about the first…